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A health & fitness app that blends workouts and meals

The older I get, the more it seems to make sense to treat health and fitness as a sustainable lifestyle journey rather than a rigid regimen for the sole purpose of hitting goals.

The body positivity and self-care movements are trendier than ever, undoubtedly due to the fact that a large portion of society has become largely aware of just how unsustainable (and sometimes downright dangerous) dieting and weight loss tactics can be.

We could all perhaps use a little less rigidity and a lot more balance in our lives. And this is exactly what 8fit strives to help you with, by taking more of a holistic approach to health and fitness.

What is 8fit?

8fit is a comprehensive health and fitness app that integrates four main areas: exercise, daily movement, meal planning/tracking, and meditation. It essentially eliminates the need to use a separate app for each of these areas.

Although 8fit’s philosophy is more about building and sustaining healthy habits than it is about helping you get to your goal weight by a certain date, you can still use the app for weight loss purposes. When you first sign up, you’ll be asked a series of questions about yourself and the types of goals you have so that it can create a personalized experience.

The app interface features a clean and minimal design that’s easy to use, with main menu options at the bottom. On the main feed, you’ll see suggested programs and featured workouts, including upcoming classes you can sign up to follow along with or classes that have previously been held and will expire soon.

There’s also a handy little goal counter for completing workouts, logging meals, hitting your daily step count and completing meditation sessions so you can see at a glance how you’re hitting your goals for each area on a daily basis. It’s pretty basic, but that’s the point — you don’t necessarily need anything overly complicated to track your daily progress.

Weekly goals you set can easily be seen at a glance.

Credit: ElISE MOREAU

Users can pick workouts based on a variety of preferences.

Users can pick workouts based on a variety of preferences.

Credit: ELISE MOREAU

Working out with 8fit felt great, but it was limited for free users

8fit offers a good variety of workouts in categories like boxing, HIIT, yoga, pilates, stretch, strength, bands, and weights. There may not be hundreds of workouts to choose from, but there are enough to keep things fresh and interesting — especially if you’re willing to shift between workout types. Just know that there are more workouts in some categories than there are in others. For instance, I counted 58 workouts in the weight lifting category and just 27 in yoga.

The workouts mainly come in two different styles. The first is your classic video-style workout, featuring recorded video content of one of the app’s many fitness coaches actually performing the workout themselves and guiding you through it as they go. The second style is sequence workout, such as a time interval workout, which is a little more self-paced. For each move in the sequence, you’re shown a brief video of someone performing each move before a timer automatically starts so you can do the move yourself.

Workouts are meant to be kept relatively short. Most are around 10 to 20 minutes, with the longest one I’ve come across at 35 minutes. Each workout is labeled beginner, intermediate, advanced, or all levels so you know what to expect in terms of difficulty.

Before you start a workout, the app tells you what you need to get ready, which can be helpful if it’s your first time trying it. I found that the video-style workouts were very professional in terms of picture quality, coach performance/guidance, and the environment it took place in.

The sequence-style workouts were easy to follow and easy to pause if I missed something. When you finish, you’re asked to rate the workout as easy, perfect, or hard and choose an emoji (no, OK, or loved it) so that 8fit can improve its suggestions for you later on.

I really liked that you can select an individual workout on a whim, or you can sign up for a program that lasts several weeks. On the Workout tab, you can also see the newest workouts that have been added and the most popular workouts.

The biggest downside? Most workouts are only available for premium subscribers. You can tell by noticing the obvious padlock icon in the top left of any workout thumbnail. Without upgrading to premium, the number of workouts you’re able to press play on is extremely limited.

Sequence-style workouts walk you through one move at a time.

Sequence-style workouts walk you through one move at a time.

Credit: ELISE MOREAU

You get a chance to prep for each move, which was super helpful.

You get a chance to prep for each move, which was super helpful.

Credit: ELISE MOREAU

Meal planning is for premium subscribers only

I love exploring health and lifestyle apps that combine both fitness and food. Why use two apps when you can tackle both in one?

Upon navigating to the Meals tab, you’ll first be asked a series of questions about your diet type, foods you dislike, the types of recipes you’re interested in, how many meals per day you eat, and how much variety you want. 8fit then uses this information to build your personalized meal plan.

Unfortunately, free members can’t get access to any of the meal planning features. After answering all your meal-related questions, you’ll be asked to upgrade to move forward. Annoying, I know.

If you decide to upgrade, you’ll notice that the meal planning process is quite intuitive to browse and customize to your liking. You get tabs for each meal (breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack) with recipe tabs featuring photos, nutritional information, prep time, ingredients, directions, and kitchen tools you’ll need. You can even tap on an individual ingredient in a recipe to see its nutritional information and take advantage of the shopping list feature that tells you all the ingredients you’ll need based on the recipes in your meal plan.

If you eat something or do an activity outside of the 8fit app, you can log it manually. Logging on 8fit is very basic, and it’s primarily there to help you become more aware of your habits as opposed to tracking stats like calories consumed, calories burned, macronutrients, and so on.

That’s another thing — because 8fit is more of an awareness-building app for your lifestyle habits, you won’t see much in terms of data and analytics. Besides the mini goal tracker on the home feed and the calendar on your profile, you don’t get any charts, graphs, or other analysis. It’s also not designed to integrate with other fitness wearables or apps besides Apple Health and Google Fit, making it less versatile in that sense.

Plan your meals ahead, and easily change them if you want something else.

Plan your meals ahead, and easily change them if you want something else.

Credit: ELISE MOREAU

An in-depth view of the meal of the day.

An in-depth view of the meal of the day.

Credit: ELISE MOREAU

Is 8fit worth the premium upgrade?

I’ll be honest: The free version of the app isn’t very useful since almost all of its workout content is locked and you get no access to meal planning at all. The more you use it as a free member, the more pop-ups you’ll receive asking you to upgrade.

Despite the limitations of the free version, the app is beautifully designed and the content is excellent. It takes most of the decision-making out of trying to figure out what workout to do and what kinds of meals to plan without getting repetitive, making it worth the upgrade to an annual subscription for $79.99 if you like what you saw in the free version and simply want to take full advantage of the content and features.

Overall, 8fit offers a very practical, all-in-one destination for discovering new content, tracking daily habits, and sustaining a healthy lifestyle by discovering new workouts, programs, and recipes. It’s a breath of fresh air among a myriad of apps that focus mostly on numbers.

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Dev Patel dazzles in David Lowery’s captivating ‘The Green Knight’

I do not know at what point The Green Knight won me over.

David Lowery’s feature film, which adapted from the Arthurian story Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, is exceedingly slow and often so bizarre it defies description. It’s also some of the most magnificent and breathtaking cinema in recent history — par for the course for Lowery, who wrote and directed 2017’s A Ghost Story. The Green Knight now cements him as a master of genre, escapism, and mesmerizing visual language.

Star Dev Patel plays Gawain, a young man who craves greatness but flees from it. When an otherworldly knight (Ralph Ineson) arrives unannounced at the King’s (Sean Harris) Christmas feast, Gawain accepts his challenge: Strike the knight anywhere, and he will return the same blow “one year hence.” Gawain goes straight for the throat, slicing the knight’s head clean off — before his decapitated body picks it up and leaves, promising to strike Gawain back a year later.

The film unfolds in whimsical chapters: “The Christmas Game,” “A Too-Quick Year,” “A Kindness,” and “An Interlude,” each its own stylistic vignette. One is ironic, one violent, one horror, but the shifts never interrupt and only enhance the overall tone.

It’s best to leave these unspoiled, but Erin Kellyman’s segment is a standout, while a play-within-a-play foreshadows Gawain’s fate in what he dreads will be the final months of his life. He seeks out the Knight even as his lover Essel (Alicia Vikander) tries to dissuade him, because a great man would not do such a thing.

Dev Patel is truly legendary as Sir Gawain in “The Green Knight.”
Credit: a24

And so the film becomes a long, luxuriant meditation on greatness itself, an old-fashioned fascination with nobility or lack thereof. It’s not an easy sell given our distance from medieval society, and among the film’s many impressive feats is that it makes a case for antiquated greatness — or at least for how its pursuit alters the seeker. Characters explore this through action and dialogue, which the film magnificently mirrors.

Even without any script or story to speak of, The Green Knight could exist solely to boast its artistry. Minutes pass without dialogue, sometimes without even a human in sight, turning the experience over to Jade Healy’s production design, Christine McDonagh and David Pink’s art direction, and Malgosia Turzanska’s gorgeous costumes. Lowery once again teams up with cinematographer Andrew Droz Palermo for contemplative stationary shots and quiet, steady panning — all of which they deployed to stunning effect in A Ghost Story — set to Daniel Hart’s magnetic score.


With Patel in the lead, Lowery recognizes greatness in front of the camera and unleashes it.

With Patel in the lead, Lowery recognizes greatness in front of the camera and unleashes it in full force. It’s an inspired casting choice and easily a career-best performance; for an actor with over a decade of high-profile work, it feels like Patel was born to play this role, unlocking new depths in both Gawain and himself.

He gets to speak in his real voice, for one, not accented as the token Indian tour guide for white leads, and the casting choice should embarrass any Hollywood figure still shutting people of color out of historically white roles. It has been a quiet, triumphant evolution from gawky teen to epic symbol, and Patel wears the mantle like it’s destiny.

Vikander commands her scenes, but overall Essel and Gawain’s mother (Sarita Choudhury) aren’t very necessary. They pray for his safety, question his foolhardy quest, and then disappear for most of the remaining runtime. This isn’t a shortcoming of performance or script, but an inherent byproduct of a story set so squarely on the shoulders of one actor. Gawain’s introspection takes precedence over any supporting player, and they exist mostly to support him in the few scenes they have — particularly Harris and Joel Edgerton.

At just over two hours, The Green Knight is mesmerizing and immersive until the last millisecond. By the time it twists and turns and coils and uncoils to deliver those final moments, it’s a veritable feast of what movies have to offer, in no small part thanks to Lowery’s confident command of the cinematic language. It’s no surprise that greatness in cinema, as in Gawain’s story, comes from patience, attention, and imagination. The result is truly legendary.

The Green Knight arrives in theaters and on-demand Friday July 30.

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98% off online course bundle (UK deal)


Deal pricing and availability subject to change after time of publication.

TL;DR: The Complete 2021 Piano for Beginners Bundle is on sale for £14.54 as of July 27, saving you 98% on list price.


Want to learn piano but don’t have time to commit to weekly lessons? Consider opting for a virtual course bundle, so you can learn from the experts on your own time.

This Complete 2021 Piano for Beginners Bundle features six courses and over 13 hours of training, which you can work through at your own pace. These lessons are virtual, have no mandatory time commitment, and can be done whenever you have the time.

The lessons are taught by pro keyboard player and session musician David Brogan and piano professor Ilse Lozoya. Both have earned 4.4 out of 5 stars on average from previous students and teach via dynamic video lessons. You’ll learn by actually playing, but you can pause the video lessons as needed.

No prior piano knowledge is needed to get started. Having an instrument to practice on, however, is highly recommended (even if it’s one made of virtual lasers).

This training is valued at £868, but for a limited time, you can sign up for all six courses for just £14.54.



Credit: Skill Success

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93% off Infosec4TC Platinum (UK deal)


Deal pricing and availability subject to change after time of publication.

TL;DR: Get lifetime access to a Infosec4TC Platinum Membership for £50.18 as of July 27, saving you 93% on list price.


When it comes to a career in cybersecurity, there are lots of possibilities. You just need the right training.

Speaking of the right training, lifetime access to all Infosec4TC courses and programs is on sale for only £50.18 for a limited time. With more than 1,800 hours of training on everything from ethical hacking to GSEC to CISSP and more, that’s a pretty great deal.

There are over 90 different courses included, like Cyber Security Certifications Practice Questions 2021, GSEC Certification Security Essentials, and CISSP Exam Preparation Training, to name a few. Fortunately, you can pick and choose what you want to focus on and work through everything on your own schedule.

A platinum membership not only gives you lifetime access to the online courses, but all future courses, extra course materials, exam questions, and access to the student portal as well. You’ll even get a free session with a career counselor to help you plan your next move following your training.  

While it’s valued at £726, you can get lifetime access to this membership for only £50.18 for a limited time.



Credit: Infosec4TC

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Samsung’s upcoming Z Fold 3 and Z Flip 3 share some Galaxy Note DNA

Galaxy Unpacked may be just a few weeks away, but Samsung isn’t leaving much to the imagination.

On Monday, the company’s president and head of mobile communications business, Tae Moon Roh, confirmed in a recent blog post that two foldable phones are on the way.

Oh, and that the Galaxy Note is dead.

Well, those weren’t his words exactly. Towards the bottom of the post, Roh writes:

“I hope you’ll join us as we debut our next Galaxy Z family and share some foldable surprises — including the first-ever S Pen designed specifically for foldable phones. Instead of unveiling a new Galaxy Note this time around, we will further broaden beloved Note features to more Samsung Galaxy devices.”

Historically speaking, Samsung has always saved the second half of the year for its Galaxy Note lineup. But considering Roh began to temper expectations for a new model as far back as last year, the news isn’t shocking.

In a blog post published in December of 2020, he wrote that Samsung has “been paying attention to people’s favorite aspects of the Galaxy Note experience and [is] excited to add some of its most well-loved features to other devices in our lineup.”

A month later, Samsung announced its Galaxy S21 lineup with S-Pen compatibility on the S21 Ultra — another hint that the company was preparing to let go of the Galaxy Note. And now, its upcoming foldable phones are also receiving the S-Pen treatment.

Samsung’s post doesn’t go into detail regarding what the stylus will look like or how it will function, but a recent leak gives us some insight.

According to leaked renders from 91mobile, a Galaxy Z Fold 3 folio case features a slot for the S-Pen. That leads us to believe the new foldable phone won’t have its own dedicated S-Pen slot. And seeing as how Samsung offered a similar case for the S21 Ultra, this latest S-Pen will probably act as an optional accessory.

Speaking of the Z Fold 3, it’s still unclear whether that will be the foldable’s official name. Throughout the blog post, Roh consistently refers to the company’s third-generation foldables as the “upcoming” Z Fold and Z Flip.

It remains to be seen whether the company will decide to tack on extra monikers like “21,” or “5G,” or perhaps even both — you know, to make it sound extra confusing.

As for what we can expect for the upcoming foldable phones? Other than a more durable display and some recycled camera specs, the leaks don’t point to all that much. Of course, we won’t have to wait long to find out as all will be revealed on August 11.

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Nokia revives the legendary 6310 phone with a larger, curvy display

There was a point in history, at least in my mind, when Nokia 6310 was the best phone you could get. More advanced than the 3xxx series and yet not as bulky as the Communicator, the Nokia 6310 was the phone to get in the early aughts if money was no object, and getting things done was the priority.

Now, HMD Global, which owns the Nokia brand, has launched a remake of the Nokia 6310 under the same name. As is typical of Nokia’s remakes, it’s a cheap, little, basic phone that sort of looks like the original (more on that later) but has been updated to be more usable today.

In terms of specs, this means the Nokia 6310 has a 2.8-inch display with curvy edges, a numerical keypad, 8MB of RAM, 16MB of storage (expandable to 32GB via microSD cards), a rear 0.3-megapixel camera, and FM radio. Yes, it’s very, very basic.

One good thing about a phone as simple as this one is that its 1,150mAh battery can last for “weeks” between charges — just like the one on the original 6310.

Whip up this baby out of pocket, and literally no one will know that it’s a remake of the old Nokia 6310.
Credit: NOKIA

The design, unfortunately, has little to do with the original Nokia 6310. That phone had a three-tone look (it came in a couple of flavors; my favorite was the light grey/dark grey/gold combo) which, while obviously outdated, still seems to say “I’m a flagship device for serious businessmen,” or something like that.

The new 6310 bears almost no likeness to the old one — the shape of the device is different, the buttons are different, even the color schemes are different (the new phone comes in four colors: dark green, yellow, black, and (only in India) light blue).

The new Nokia 6310 and the old Nokia 6310 (pictured; technically, it's a 6310i but they're very similar) aren't exactly peas in a pod.

The new Nokia 6310 and the old Nokia 6310 (pictured; technically, it’s a 6310i but they’re very similar) aren’t exactly peas in a pod.
Credit: Shutterstock

The new Nokia has revived several of its old, famous phones like this. I liked the Nokia 3310, which was fairly similar to the original, but was underwhelmed with the Nokia 8110, also known as the Matrix phone. Those two devices, however, at least bore some resemblance to their forefathers; the new Nokia 6310 is similar to the old one only in name. OK, there is one other thing: The new phone also has Snake.

Alongside the new 6310, Nokia also launched a couple of new smartphones.

The Nokia C30 is an entry-level device running Android Go with a 6.82-inch display, a 13-megapixel camera on the back, a 5-megapixel selfie camera on the front, 2GB of RAM, and 32GB of storage (expandable up to 256GB via a microSD card). The phone’s highlight is its 6,000mAh battery, which should keep the phone running for “up to three days.”

Nokia C30 is a cheap smartphone with a massive battery.

Nokia C30 is a cheap smartphone with a massive battery.
Credit: NOKIA

The Nokia XR20 is a rugged smartphone made to MIL-STD-810H standard and with IP68 water and dust resistance, meaning it shouldn’t break when you drop it or submerge it underwater.

Nokia XR20 is the brand's most durable smartphone yet.

Nokia XR20 is the brand’s most durable smartphone yet.
Credit: NOKIA

It has a 6.67-inch display, a 48/13-megapixel camera, an 8-megapixel selfie camera, 4/6GB of RAM, 64/128GB of storage (expandable up to 512GB via a microSD card), and a 4,630mAh battery.

Availability dates for these devices haven’t been announced yet, but we know the prices in the UK and Europe. The Nokia 6310 will cost £49.99 ($69) in the UK and 40 EUR in Europe, the Nokia C30 will be available for £99 ($136) in the UK and 99 EUR in Europe. The Nokia XR20 will cost £399 ($549) in the UK for the 4/64GB version, and £449 ($618) for the 6/128GB version. The average price for this model will be 499 EUR in Europe, Nokia says.

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Velvet Thruster dildos pump for you — and I tried them

Have you ever been scared and horny at the same time? That’s how I felt looking at The Thruster, a handheld thrusting dildo.

Yes, as the name implies, this dildo does the thrusting for you.

The Thruster is a less expensive, more petite take on “fucking machines” like the Cowgirl Machine, which can run you $2,000.

Velvet Thruster cofounders and couple Danyell and Alex Fima began the company in 2017 after working at Boeing, Airbus, and NASA as aerospace engineers. (Yes. That’s right.) The work was stressful and carried major liabilities, they explain in Velvet Thruster’s about page so they channeled their passion and expertise in advanced engineering into… what else? Sex toys.

The company’s goal, according to Danyell Fima, was to replace those bulky, ultra-pricey handheld toys. In previous decades, smaller batteries weren’t powerful enough to make it happen. Now, the technology is there.

That being said, these self-pumping dildos aren’t cheap: The most affordable option, the Thruster Mini (“Teddy”), retails at $166, while the Thruster Prime will run you $234 before any additional add-ons.

There are fucking machines cheaper than the Thruster on the market (for instance, this jackhammer-looking thing on Amazon), but the Thruster is hand-controllable and more compact, thus easier to store.

The Thruster and its website look intimidating at first glance, the latter due to the many customization options for the Prime. Choose from four colors (lilac, mint, black, and red), and, in the case of the Prime, different head styles ranging from standard dildos to heads made specifically for the G-spot or prostate. Each head has its own page — such as the Walter for anal penetration — to help you decide.

The nitty-gritty on the Thruster

The Prime has an insertable length of seven inches and a total length of 11. I’m not a complete dildo novice, but I am certainly a sex machine novice, so I figured the Prime would be a bit much for me.

Instead, I tried two of Thruster’s other offerings: Teddy and Teddy XL ($182). These are both smaller than the Prime: Teddy is the company’s smallest at an insertable length of five inches and extending to nine in total. For Teddy XL, it’s six inches and ten inches respectively.

The thrusters are made of platinum-cured, body-safe silicone. The Teddy models have realistic dildo attachments, and while the lengths are different, the circumferences are the same, at 4.5 inches in the middle of the shaft.

The bottom of the toy has an accordion-like structure that extends and retracts the toy to create the thrusting motion. Both Teddys have 2.5 inches of vibrating thrust (it extends and retracts 2.5 inches when thrusting), according to Thruster, and six adjustable speeds. They differ slightly in that the Teddy speeds up to 125 strokes per minute, while Teddy XL speeds up to 128 strokes per minute. For comparison, the average dick owner thrusts 48 times per minute.

All Thrusters are cordless and come with their own chargers. You can use Teddy for up to two hours of battery life, and 2.5 hours with the Teddy XL. They can also be used while charging, but I recommend waiting for a wireless experience.

Mini Thruster – Teddy – in Lilac.

Credit: velvet thruster

Teddy XL in Mint.

Teddy XL in Mint.

Credit: velvet thruster

What using the Thruster is like

Many dildos are made of body-safe silicone, but there was something special about the Thrusters. The top of the shaft is bendable while the bottom half is sturdy, probably due to the motor. While the dildo doesn’t feel exactly like skin — how can it? And would you even want it to? — it’s soft, fitting the “velvet” in the company’s name.

The part-bendable, part-stiff dildo of the Teddys made maneuvering and inserting easier than with a standard dildo (though, as with all sex toys, I recommend using lots of lube). The Thruster comes with three standard buttons: On/off, plus, and minus to increase/decrease the speed; they’re big and easy to handle when using the Thruster.

Watching the Thruster in action is pretty remarkable. I noticed that after a few minutes and at higher speeds, the accordion pumps out air and sounds like a queef. Not a bad thing, but it did make me laugh.

The sensations weren’t dissimilar from penetration from a strap-on, only this time I was alone and controlling the speed of the thrusts myself.

I found the Teddys easy to use when lying down — and especially less rigorous than using a standard dildo because the thruster does the work for me — but if you don’t want to reach that far, Thruster offers a long-reach handle for solo play and a partner play handle for use in couples. The Teddys have a suction-cup base, which is also clutch for hands-free, doggy-style thrusting as you can stick it on your wall (or your floor, or any hard surface).

Thruster claims these toys will help achieve vaginal orgasms. I’ve never had the pleasure of experiencing a vaginal orgasm, but along with clit stimulation these toys led to some stellar masturbation sessions.

“Vaginal orgasms aren’t the easiest to achieve considering a perfect amount of repetitive stroking, rubbing, and rhythm is needed,” Fima noted. While people with penises or strap-ons may not have the stamina for their partner to reach a vaginal orgasm, Thrusters can go for hours.

Needless to say, I’ll keep experimenting.

Thruster aftercare and logistics

These toys are water-resistant, meaning that they can’t be submerged in water, but they can be washed without having to worry about destroying them. This makes cleaning the dildos much easier.

Since the bottom of the Thrusters has “accordion” grooves (seen in the photos), Velvet Thruster created a way to easily turn the toy off when extended in order to clean them: While the toy is in use, press the on/off button twice within three seconds. The thruster will stop with the accordion extended and can be thoroughly washed.

A downside to the Thrusters is that they don’t come with a travel pouch or case. According to the website, the cardboard box it comes in acts as storage. A cardboard box doesn’t strike me as the best place to keep a dildo, but it’s not the end of the world.

The toy comes with a one-sheeter that teaches the user how to charge and clean the toy, but I wish there were a bit more details about the mechanics. I had to find the charge time (2 hours for Teddy and 2.5 for Teddy XL), for example, on the Thrusters website.

None of these snags are terrible and they don’t disrupt my enjoyment of the toys, but they stuck out to me. There’s always room for improvement.

Is the Thruster worth the price?

The Thruster is by no means a beginner toy, or even a beginner dildo. If you want to explore penetrative toys, I’d recommend starting out with a stationary dildo (many of which come with suction-cup ends as well).

I also wouldn’t recommend the Thruster to novice users or to users that prefer clitoral stimulation over vaginal or anal stimulation.

For experienced dildo users who love penetration, however, the Thruster may be perfect for you, if it’s in your price range. The self-thrusting action is a marvel, and for those who want powerful movements without having to put in any effort yourself, you can’t go wrong with this.

I had the most fun with the smallest Thruster, the Teddy, because the size worked the best for me. It also happens to be under $200.

The Thruster gives you the power of a sex machine in your hand. If that sounds scary, this isn’t for you! If it’s enticing, however, I’d highly consider purchasing one.

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Elon Musk explains how non-Tesla cars will use Superchargers

At what may have been Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s final quarterly check-in, the electric vehicle evangelist delved into the details about eventually sharing Tesla’s Supercharger network.

Last week Musk tweeted about opening up the exclusive Supercharger network to other electric vehicles. Supercharging has only been available to Tesla owners. During Monday’s second quarter earnings call he spelled out what this change would look like in the near-future.

It’ll be a matter of just downloading the Tesla app and heading to a Tesla charger and plugging in, even if you’re riding in a Nissan Leaf instead of a Tesla Model 3.

For cars that charge at a slower rate than Teslas (Tesla vehicles are all capable of fast charging, while some older non-Teslas can’t take in electricity at that quick of a rate), the longer charge time will cost drivers more.

“The biggest constraint is time,” Musk said.

Tesla will also introduce dynamic pricing, charging more for electricity at rush hour, for example. When a station is empty it’ll be cheaper than when it’s “jam-packed,” as Musk put it.

Tesla vehicles have a different connector in North America (which Musk hailed as “the best connector”) to the charging port, so non-Teslas will need to use an adapter. Tesla will provide those at the Supercharger stations unless there’s a theft problem, Musk said.

You’ll need a Tesla adapter for non-Tesla Supercharging.
Credit: Tesla

In the California car company’s latest earning report there were a reported 2,966 Supercharger stations worldwide, which is up 46 percent from a year before.

But that number needs to keep growing, especially as Tesla sold a record number of vehicles (mostly Model Y and 3 vehicles) in the most recent quarter, and plans to open up access to any and all vehicles with a plug-in battery.

“For the Superchargers to be useful to other cars, we need to grow the network faster than vehicle output,” he said in Monday’s call.

Since last week’s tweet there’s been a lot of groaning from Tesla owners, especially about longer wait times and crowded stations. But Musk summed up why this will be a good move for the greater EV movement.

“Our goal is to support the advent of sustainable energy,” he said. “It’s not to create a walled garden and bludgeon our competitors.”

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Blanket your home in better WiFi with mesh systems on sale


Deal pricing and availability subject to change after time of publication.

If you frequently suffer from a poor internet connection during virtual meetings, it may be time to consider a WiFi mesh network.

Mesh systems are designed to blanket your home in WiFi, extending your wireless coverage by sharing the network across multiple devices. If you have a large home, an old home, or one with an unusual layout, you may encounter dead zones with your internet connection and speed. That’s where a mesh network truly shines — it covers the areas a typical router can’t reach.

These highly-rated options from MeshForce are on sale as of July 26.

The MeshForce M1 supports up to 60 devices with dual-band WiFi connectivity. With the three WiFi points (included), you can cover up to 4,500 square feet in your home. The full system even connects to a My Mesh app, where you can pause WiFi to specific devices and even manage your children’s screen time. Get the M1 Whole Home System for just $117.99 for a limited time.

Like the M1, the M3 can cover 4,500 square feet, support up to 60 devices, and connect to the My Mesh app for parental control, connection management, and guest networks. With the M3, you’ll get the M3 router, two M3 Dots, and an ethernet cable for $136.99. Choose from white or midnight black ($142.99) to match your home aesthetic.


Meshforce M3 Mesh WiFi System (white) — $142.99

Credit: Speedefy


Meshforce M3 Mesh WiFi System (black) — $142.99

Credit: Speedefy

The M3S WiFi system comes with three M3s WiFi points that can cover up to 6,000 square feet. They’re also compatible with MeshForce M1 points and M3 Dots. Get it in white ($164.99) or midnight black ($168.99) for a limited time.


Meshforce M3s Mesh WiFi System (black) — $164.99

Credit: Speedefy


Meshforce M3s Mesh WiFi System — $164.99

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Olympic gymnasts tired of being objectified swap leotards for bodysuits

The German gymnastics team is attracting attention for more than its gravity-defying moves at this year’s Olympic games in Tokyo.

In an effort to prevent the sexualization of their bodies and the sport (and just feel comfortable while competing), the gymnasts traded in standard bikini-cut leotards for full-body unitards on Sunday during an Olympics qualifying round.

“We wanted to show that every woman, everybody, should decide what to wear,” said Elisabeth Seitz, a 27-year-old German Olympics gymnast, before the qualifying event, according to Reuters.

Elizabeth Seitz, German gymnast, competes in the Tokyo Olympics in a unitard.
Credit: IRIS VAN DEN BROEK / Getty Images

German gymnast Pauline Schaefer-Betz wears a unitard as she flips upside down during the artistic gymnastics balance beam event during the Tokyo Olympic Games.

German gymnast Pauline Schaefer-Betz wears a unitard as she flips upside down during the artistic gymnastics balance beam event during the Tokyo Olympic Games.
Credit: IONEL BONAVENTURE / Getty Images

While bucking tradition, this is not the first time the German team has worn these full-body outfits, which reach their ankles. In April, they donned the bodysuits during the European championships, the Washington Post reported.

That move garnered the team widespread praise from other female gymnasts, according to Reuters.

The International Gymnastics Federation, the governing body of competitive gymnastics, allows gymnasts to compete in uniforms that cover or semi-cover their arms and fully obscure their legs, as long as the color matches their leotards, CNN reported. However, gymnasts have usually covered their legs in competition because of religious reasons, per Reuters.

Back in June, American gold medalist Simone Biles said she supported athletes being able to wear their preferred uniform, even if she’ll be sticking to the traditional leotard. “I stand with their decision to wear whatever they please and whatever makes them feel comfortable,” Biles said of the German gymnasts, according to the Associated Press. “So if anyone out there wants to wear a unitard or leotard, it’s totally up to you.”

Germany's Kim Bui shows off her moves in a unitard in a qualifying round of the Tokyo Olympic Games.

Germany’s Kim Bui shows off her moves in a unitard in a qualifying round of the Tokyo Olympic Games.
Credit: AFP via Getty Images

The unitards shouldn’t affect the athletes’ ability to perform at their peak condition.

“We also train in tights so we are used to the feeling,” said Kim Bui, a 32-year-old German Olympics gymnast, according to Reuters. “It is not that different between competition or training. It is comfortable and that is the most important thing.”

While the German gymnasts’ bodysuits didn’t break any regulations, the same can’t be said for the women’s beach handball team from Norway when they played in a separate competition. On Monday, the European Handball Federation fined each Norwegian female athlete on the team 150 euros ($177) each for wearing shorts rather than bikini bottoms during a game, the New York Times reported.

The federation requires female players to wear bikini bottoms with “with a close fit and cut on an upward angle toward the top of the leg.” However, male handball athletes can wear shorts.

The Norwegian Handball Federation offered to pay the fines, as has singer Pink.

“The European handball federation should be fined for sexism. Good on ya, ladies,” Pink wrote on Twitter on Saturday.

For the German gymnasts at the Olympics, they wanted to look good without feeling uncomfortable.

The team decided as a group to wear the bodysuit before the meet.

“We sat together today and said, OK, we want to have a big competition,” said Sarah Voss, a 21-year-old gymnast, reported the Associated Press. “We want to feel amazing, we want to show everyone that we look amazing.”